Elizabeth

Elizabeth is about one hour SE of Denver.

Elizabeth started out as Webber Sawmill. As the Denver & New Orleans Railroad
came into the area, the town boomed. Elizabeth was named for Elizabeth Ray
Kimbark Hubbard, who was the sister-in-law of Governor John Evans. It is said she
was on the first train of the Denver New Orleans Railroad to reach Elizabeth in 1880.
The plat was filed on June 19, 1882, but the incorporation did not take place until
1890 when the population made it to 200 residents.

The founding of Elizabeth: 1882
The incorporation date of Elizabeth: 1890

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Buffalo Boyd's II Restaurant & Saloon

                  344 E. Kiowa Avenue  on Colorado Hwy 86
                               Elizabeth, CO  80107
                                     303-646-5007

























             
              



                              
 George the ghost


..."The old building that houses Buffalo Boyd's in Elizabeth was built in 1898....and
one of the girls who used to work in the building said the ghost's name is George,
said Sue Sneddon, co-owner of Buffalo Boyd's."


George has made his presence known on a couple of occasions, "misting" the
employees while they were closing up for the night, moving wiring along the wall
during renovation, and slamming the door shut while people were in the room.

"Late at night when you're here by yourself, you can get very frightened because it's
a little eerie when you're thinking someone is in the building with you," Sue said.

"He only gets upset when people aren't happy. He only likes a happy crew. He's more
of a prankster."

"So far George hasn't made an appearance during the dinner hour, which suits
Sneddon just fine.

The structure has seen many incarnations over the years. At various times it has
houses everything from a general store, to a feed store, an antique store to a series
of restaurants.

Doors open and close on their own, with no wind or open window to provide a
scientific explanation.

Waitresses report a cold draft or a cold mist along exposed skin. A stacked cup
comes loose from its nest and falls off a shelf.

During remodeling, Sue Sneddon was alone on the main floor when a heavy
telephone wire began waving up and down the wall. Human hands were at neither
end.

More recently, she was in the basement when she heard the sound of a wet towel hit
the basement floor, as if someone threw it from the stairs above. Again, nothing was
there.

"One of the scariest stories I heard was when a plumber was working in the basement
on some copper pipes, and the phone started to ring upstairs." Sneddon said.

"The phone rang three times, and each time the plumber ran up the stairs to find a
dead line. On his third return, his copper pipes were laid in a criss-cross pattern
across each stair. All the way to the bottom."

Sneddon has spoken with people who owned or rented the building before, some of
whom have scary stories of their own to share-- pots flying in the kitchen, that sort of
thing.



Source: Elbert County News

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This building was first called City Drug- and was owned by Reed and Dickerson.
Otto and Eva Schou (Adams) took over the drugstore business in 1946.

Some of the occupants of the building after the Schous' were: A meat market, several
restaurants: (a Mexican restaurant and The Branding Iron, Running Creek Grill),
Heather Dawn dog grooming parlor, and a laundromat.



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Elizabeth is in Elbert County, a county in central Colorado... and southeast of the
capital of Denver. Elizabeth makes up the most population of Elbert County because
of people living in small acreage subdivisions. Elizabeth is known for extraordinary
horse property, panoramic views of the Rocky Mountains, as well as having easy
access for Denver (I-25 is about 25 minutes away).  









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